Mental illness in Bwindi, Uganda: Understanding stakeholder perceptions of benefits and barriers to developing a community-based mental health programme

African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine


 
 
Field Value
 
Title Mental illness in Bwindi, Uganda: Understanding stakeholder perceptions of benefits and barriers to developing a community-based mental health programme
 
Creator Sessions, Kristen L. Wheeler, Lydia Shah, Arya Farrell, Deenah Agaba, Edwin Kuule, Yusufu Merry, Stephen P.
 
Subject global health, psychiatry, mental health mental health; community mental health; psychiatry; primary care
Description Background: Mental illness has been increasingly recognised as a source of morbidity in low- and middle-income countries and significant treatment gaps exist worldwide. Studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of task sharing through community-based treatment models for addressing international mental health issues.Aim: This paper aims to evaluate the perceptions of a wide range of mental health stakeholders in a Ugandan community regarding the benefits and barriers to developing a community-based mental health programme.Setting: Bwindi Community Hospital (BCH) in south-west Uganda provides services through a team of community health workers to people in the Kanungu District.Methods: Thematic analysis of 13 semi-structured interviews and 6 focus group discussions involving 54 community members and 13 mental health stakeholders within the BCH catchment area.Results: Stakeholders perceived benefits to a community-based compared to a hospital-based programme, including improved patient care, lower costs to patients and improved community understanding of mental illness. They also cited barriers including cost, insufficient workforce and a lack of community readiness.Conclusions: Stakeholders express interest in developing community-based mental health programmes, as they feel that it will address mental health needs in the community and improve community awareness of mental illness. However, they also report that cost is a significant barrier to programme development that will have to be addressed prior to being able to successfully establish such programming. Additionally, many community members expressed unique sociocultural beliefs regarding the nature of mental illness and those suffering from a psychiatric disease.
 
Publisher AOSIS
 
Contributor Mayo Clinic Department of Family Medicine
Date 2017-11-30
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion — Qualitative research
Format text/html application/epub+zip text/xml application/pdf
Identifier 10.4102/phcfm.v9i1.1462
 
Source African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine; Vol 9, No 1 (2017); 7 pages 2071-2936 2071-2928
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://phcfm.org/index.php/phcfm/article/view/1462/2337 https://phcfm.org/index.php/phcfm/article/view/1462/2336 https://phcfm.org/index.php/phcfm/article/view/1462/2338 https://phcfm.org/index.php/phcfm/article/view/1462/2333
 
Coverage Uganda May through August of 2015 mental health stakeholders in Bwindi, Uganda
Rights Copyright (c) 2017 Kristen L. Sessions, Lydia Wheeler, Arya Shah, Deenah Farrell, Edwin Agaba, Yusufu Kuule, Stephen P. Merry https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0