Sexual risk compensation following voluntary medical male circumcision: Results from a prospective cohort study amongst human immunodeficiency virus-negative adult men in Botswana

Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine


 
 
Field Value
 
Title Sexual risk compensation following voluntary medical male circumcision: Results from a prospective cohort study amongst human immunodeficiency virus-negative adult men in Botswana
 
Creator Spees, Lisa P. Wirth, Kathleen E. Mawandia, Shreshth Bazghina-werq, Semo Ledikwe, Jenny H.
 
Subject — circumcision; HIV prevention; Botswana; sexual behaviour; risk-taking; prospective studies
Description Background: Circumcised men may increase sexual risk-taking following voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) because of decreased perceptions of risk, which may negate the beneficial impact of VMMC in preventing new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections.Objectives: We evaluated changes in sexual behaviour following VMMC.Method: We conducted a prospective cohort study amongst sexually active, HIV-negative adult men undergoing VMMC in Gaborone, Botswana, during 2013–2015. Risky sexual behaviour, defined as the number of sexual partners in the previous month and ≥ 1 concurrent sexual partnerships during the previous 3 months, was assessed at baseline (prior to VMMC) and 3 months post-VMMC. Change over time was assessed by using inverse probability weighted linear and conditional logistic regression models.Results: We enrolled 523 men; 509 (97%) provided sexual behaviour information at baseline. At 3 months post-VMMC, 368 (72%) completed the follow-up questionnaire. At baseline, the mean (95% confidence interval) number of sexual partners was 1.60 (1.48, 1.65), and 111 (31% of 353 with data) men reported engaging in concurrent partnerships. At 3 months post-VMMC, 70 (23% of 311 with data) reported fewer partners and 19% had more partners. Amongst 111 men with a concurrent partnership at baseline, 52% reported none post-VMMC. Amongst the 242 (69%) without a concurrent partnership at baseline, 19% reported initiating one post-VMMC. After adjustment for loss to follow-up, risky sexual behaviour post-VMMC (measured as mean changes in a number of partners and proportion engaging in concurrency) was similar to baseline levels.Conclusion: We found no evidence of sexual risk compensation in the 3 months following VMMC.
 
Publisher AOSIS
 
Contributor U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HIV/AIDS Bureau's Global Health Systems Branch National Center for Research Resources, National Institutes of Health
Date 2020-12-14
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion — —
Format text/html application/epub+zip text/xml application/pdf
Identifier 10.4102/sajhivmed.v21i1.1157
 
Source Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine; Vol 21, No 1 (2020); 9 pages 2078-6751 1608-9693
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://sajhivmed.org.za/index.php/hivmed/article/view/1157/2145 https://sajhivmed.org.za/index.php/hivmed/article/view/1157/2144 https://sajhivmed.org.za/index.php/hivmed/article/view/1157/2146 https://sajhivmed.org.za/index.php/hivmed/article/view/1157/2143
 
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Rights Copyright (c) 2020 Lisa P. Spees, Kathleen E. Wirth, Shreshth Mawandia, Semo Bazghina-werq, Jenny H. Ledikwe https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0