Record Details

Studies on effects of lactose on experimental Trypanosoma vivax infection in Zebu cattle. 1. Plasma kinetics of intravenously administered lactose at onset of infection and pathology

Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research


 
 
Field Value
 
Title Studies on effects of lactose on experimental Trypanosoma vivax infection in Zebu cattle. 1. Plasma kinetics of intravenously administered lactose at onset of infection and pathology
 
Creator Fatihu, M. Y.; Departmenot f Veterinary Pathology and Microbiology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria Adamu, S.; Departmenot f Veterinary Pathology and Microbiology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria Umar, I. A.; Department of Biochemistry, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria Ibrahim, N. D.G.; Departmenot f Veterinary Pathology and Microbiology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria Eduvie, L. O.; NationalAnimal Production Research Institute, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria Esievo, K. A.N.; Departmenot f Veterinary Pathology and Microbiology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria
 
Subject — —
Description Lactose in normal saline was administered intravenously to a group of Zebu cattle infected with Trypanosoma vivax to determine the bloodplasma kinetics at onset of an experimental infection and its ability to protect tissues against damage as part of preliminary studies to determine its suitability for use in the treatment of trypanosomosis. Significant (P <0.01) higher lactose concentrations were observed in the T. vivax-intecled bulls at 30 min and 1h (P< 0.05) post-infectio (p.i.) and by 4 h p.i. the plasma lactose remained above the level prior to infusion, after which it fell slightly below the preinfusion level in the uninfected group. Calculated pharmacokinetic parameters revealed delayed excretion of lactose in the T. vivax-intected group soon after infection. The total body clearance (C/B )was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced. The biological half-life (t1/2), elimination rate constant (kel) and apparent volume of distribution (Vd) were relatively decreased (P > 0.05) as a result of the T. vivax infection. Retention of lactose in the plasma was attributed to decreased plasma clearance l.t is suggested that the presence of trypanosomes in circulation rather than organic lesions could have been responsible for the delay observed in the excretion of lactose.At 12 weeks p.i., when the experiment was terminated, the group infected and given lactose infusion (despiteh igherp arasitaemia) had no gross or histopathological lesions in the brain, spleen, lymphnodes, heart, kidneys, liver and testes. However, the group infected but not infused with lactose were emaciated, had pale mucosae, watery blood, general muscular atrophy, serous atrophy of coronary fat and other adiposet issue, hepatomegalys, plenomegalys, wollen and oedematous lymph nodes, all of which are suggestive of trypanosomosis. Histopathological lesions included arrowing of Bowman's space and hypercellularity of glomerular tufts in the kidneys with the mean glomerula truft nucleairn dices (GTNs) in the group significantly higher (P <0.01)than the mean GTNs of the lactoseinfused and control bulls. Degenerative changes occurred in the myocardium, spleen, testes and epididymides. The tesicular and epididymal lesions are indicative of male reproductive dysfunction.
 
Publisher AOSIS Publishing
 
Contributor
Date 2008-08-31
 
Type — —
Format application/pdf
Identifier 10.4102/ojvr.v75i2.15
 
Source Onderstepoort J Vet Res; Vol 75, No 2 (2008); 163-172
 
Language en
 
Coverage — — —
Rights Copyright information Ownership of copyright in terms of the Work remains with the authors. The authors retain the non-exclusive right to do anything they wish with the Work, provided attribution is given to the place and detail of original publication, as set out in the official citation of the Work published in the journal. The retained right specifically includes the right to post the Work on the authors’ or their institutions’ websites or institutional repository. Publication and user license The authors grant the title owner and the publisher an irrevocable license and first right and perpetual subsequent right to (a) publish, reproduce, distribute, display and store the Work in  any form/medium, (b) to translate the Work into other languages, create adaptations, summaries or extracts of the Work or other derivative works based on the Work and exercise all of the rights set forth in (a) above in such translations, adaptations, summaries, extracts and derivative works, (c) to license others to do any or all of the above, and (d) to register the Digital Object Identifier (DOI) for the Definitive Work. The authors acknowledge and accept the user licence under which the Work will  be published as set out in http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/za/legalcode (Creative Commons Attribution License South Africa) The undersigned warrant that they have the authority to license these publication rights and that no portion of the copyright to the Work has been assigned or licensed previously to any other party. Disclaimer: The publisher, editors and title owner accept no responsibility for any statement made or opinion expressed by any other person in this Work. Consequently, they will not be liable for any loss or damage sustained by any reader as a result of his or her action upon any statement or opinion in this Work. In cases where a manuscript is NOT accepted for publication by the editorial board, the portions of this agreement regarding the publishing licensing shall be null and void and the authors will be free to submit this manuscript to any other publication for first publication. Our copyright policies are author-friendly and protect the rights of our authors and publishing partners.