Record Details

Induction of photosensitivity in sheep with Erodium moschatum (L.) L'Hérit

Journal of the South African Veterinary Association


 
 
Field Value
 
Title Induction of photosensitivity in sheep with Erodium moschatum (L.) L'Hérit
 
Creator Stroebel, J.C.
 
Subject — Erodium Moschatum; Photosensitisation; Photosensitivity; Sheep
Description Erodium moschatum is an exotic weed in the southern and southwestern coastal areas of the Western Cape Province (WCP), South Africa. It has been suspected as the cause of photosensitivity in sheep. However, attempts to induce photosensitivity by dosing it to sheep have thus far been unsuccessful. During August 1999, 2 sheep suffering from severe photosensitivity were presented for clinical examination to the Western Cape Provincial Veterinary Laboratory (WCPVL). One sheep was sacrificed for autopsy. Except for skin lesions associated with photosensitivity, no icterus or other lesions were present. Histopathological examination of affected skin revealed epidermal necrosis while the liver had no microscopic lesions. It was therefore concluded that the sheep might have been suffering from primary photosensitivity. The farmfrom which the sheep came, situated in the Malmesbury district, WCP, was visited to determine the source of the photodynamic agent. The flock from which the sheep originated had been grazing in a camp where E. moschatum was growing abundantly and had been heavily grazed. Some remaining Erodium in the camp was collected, pulped and dosed over a period of 7 days to an adult sheep. Another sheep was dosed simultaneously with Erodium growing on the premises of the WCPVL. Both sheep developed mild photosensitivity, which was confirmed by histopathological examination of skin biopsies. It was concluded that E. moschatum can induce photosensitivity (probably the primary type) in sheep if ingested in large quantities.
 
Publisher AOSIS Publishing
 
Contributor
Date 2002-07-06
 
Type — —
Format application/pdf
Identifier 10.4102/jsava.v73i2.556
 
Source Journal of the South African Veterinary Association; Vol 73, No 2 (2002); 57-61
 
Language en
 
Coverage — — —
Rights Copyright information Ownership of copyright in terms of the Work remains with the authors. The authors retain the non-exclusive right to do anything they wish with the Work, provided attribution is given to the place and detail of original publication, as set out in the official citation of the Work published in the journal. The retained right specifically includes the right to post the Work on the authors’ or their institutions’ websites or institutional repository. Disclaimer: The publisher, editors and title owner accept no responsibility for any statement made or opinion expressed by any other person in this Work. Consequently, they will not be liable for any loss or damage sustained by any reader as a result of his or her action upon any statement or opinion in this Work. In cases where a manuscript is NOT accepted for publication by the editorial board, the portions of this agreement regarding the publishing licensing shall be null and void and the authors will be free to submit this manuscript to any other publication for first publication. Our copyright policies are author-friendly and protect the rights of our authors and publishing partners.