Record Details

Serial plasma glucose changes in dogs suffering from severe dog bite wounds

Journal of the South African Veterinary Association


 
 
Field Value
 
Title Serial plasma glucose changes in dogs suffering from severe dog bite wounds
 
Creator Schoeman, J. P.; Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies,
Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X04, Onderstepoort, 0110 South Africa. Kitshoff, A. M.; Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies,
Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X04, Onderstepoort, 0110 South Africa. du Plessis, C. J.; Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies,
Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X04, Onderstepoort, 0110 South Africa. Thompson, P. N.; Department of Production Animal Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X04, Onderstepoort, 0110 South Africa.
 
Subject — —
Description The objective of this study was to describe the changes in plasma glucose concentration in 20 severely injured dogs suffering from dog bite wounds over a period of 72 hours from the initiation of trauma. Historical, signalment, clinical and haematological factors were investigated for their possible effect on plasma glucose concentration. Haematology was repeated every 24 hours and plasma glucose concentrations were measured at 8-hourly intervals post-trauma. On admission, 1 dog was hypoglycaemic, 8 were normoglycaemic and 11 were hyperglycaemic. No dogs showed hypoglycaemia at any other stage during the study period. The median blood glucose concentrations at each of the 10 collection points, excluding the 56-hour and 64-hour collection points, were in the hyperglycaemic range (5.8– 6.2 mmol/ ). Puppies and thin dogs had significantly higher median plasma glucose concentrations than adult and fat dogs respectively (P < 0.05 for both). Fifteen dogs survived the 72-hour study period. Overall 13 dogs (81.3 %) made a full recovery after treatment. Three of 4 dogs that presented in a collapsed state died, whereas all dogs admitted as merely depressed or alert survived (P = 0.004). The high incidence of hyperglycaemia can possibly be explained by the ’diabetes of injury“ phenomenon. However, hyperglycaemia in this group of dogs was marginal and potential benefits of insulin therapy are unlikely to outweigh the risk of adverse effects such as hypoglycaemia.
 
Publisher AOSIS Publishing
 
Contributor
Date 2011-04-13
 
Type — —
Format application/pdf
Identifier 10.4102/jsava.v82i1.32
 
Source Journal of the South African Veterinary Association; Vol 82, No 1 (2011); 41-46
 
Language en
 
Coverage — — —
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