The knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding family history of hereditary diseases amongst undergraduate students at the University of the Free State

South African Family Practice


 
 
Field Value
 
Title The knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding family history of hereditary diseases amongst undergraduate students at the University of the Free State
 
Creator van der Merwe, Lynette J. Nel, Gaby Williams, Caitlin Erasmus, Swalica Nel, Riana Kolver, Marize van den Heever, Benine Joubert, Gina
 
Subject — hereditary diseases; family medical history; knowledge, attitudes and practices; undergraduate students; lifestyle; non-communicable diseases
Description Background: Family medical history may help prevent, diagnose and treat inherited non-communicable diseases. Many people are unaware of family medical history, and medical practitioners may not realise its value when dealing with hereditary diseases. The study aimed to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAPs) regarding family medical history of hereditary diseases amongst undergraduate students at the University of the Free State, Bloemfontein.Methods: A cross-sectional study using a KAP survey was conducted. Questionnaires were distributed electronically to students for voluntary and anonymous completion.Results: There were 651 respondents (response rate 3.1%). Most respondents had good knowledge about their family history of hereditary diseases. Significantly more Health Sciences students reported knowing their family medical history. The majority knew that knowledge of hereditary diseases could improve quality of life, that they had a greater chance of being diagnosed if a family member already had the disease, and that lifestyle changes could improve health. Health Sciences students’ level of knowledge was higher than that of students from other faculties. At least 95% of students indicated that they would change lifestyle habits to prevent early onset of hereditary disease, but their practices regarding good healthcare were poor. Health Sciences students’ practices were significantly better, but less than half of all students had made lifestyle changes or had done screenings based on their family medical history.Conclusion: Although undergraduate respondents had good knowledge of family medical history and positive attitudes about screening, they did not adapt their practises. Health Sciences students’ KAPs reflected the acquisition of core competencies. Institutions could educate students on the importance of early screenings. 
 
Publisher AOSIS
 
Contributor
Date 2022-01-27
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion Peer-reviewed Article —
Format text/html application/epub+zip text/xml application/pdf
Identifier 10.4102/safp.v64i1.5392
 
Source South African Family Practice; Vol 64, No 1 (2022): Part 1; 8 pages 2078-6204 2078-6190
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://safpj.co.za/index.php/safpj/article/view/5392/7182 https://safpj.co.za/index.php/safpj/article/view/5392/7183 https://safpj.co.za/index.php/safpj/article/view/5392/7184 https://safpj.co.za/index.php/safpj/article/view/5392/7185
 
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Rights Copyright (c) 2022 Lynette J Van der Merwe, Gaby Nel, Caitlin Williams, Swalica Erasmus, Riana Nel, Marize Kolver, Benine van den Heever, Gina Joubert https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0