Effect of virtual reality therapy, combined with physiotherapy for improving motor proficiency in individuals with Down syndrome: A systematic review

South African Journal of Physiotherapy


 
 
Field Value
 
Title Effect of virtual reality therapy, combined with physiotherapy for improving motor proficiency in individuals with Down syndrome: A systematic review
 
Creator Stander, Jessica du Preez, Jennifer C. Kritzinger, Chantel Obermeyer, Natasha M. Struwig, Silke van Wyk, Nikki Zaayman, Jessica Burger, Marlette
 
Subject Physiotherapy; Knowledge Translation virtual reality; rehabilitation; physiotherapy; occupational therapy; Down syndrome; motor proficiency
Description Background: Individuals with Down syndrome may struggle with anticipatory postural adjustments, and adapt slower to motor tasks and environmental changes, due to decreased motor proficiency.Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of virtual reality therapy (VRT), specifically Nintendo Wii, combined with physiotherapy or occupational therapy (OT) for improving motor proficiency in individuals with Down syndrome, compared to standard physiotherapy, OT or no intervention.Method: Nine computerised databases were searched from inception to July 2020. Methodological quality of randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies was appraised using the physiotherapy evidence database (PEDro) scale and the Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Checklist for Case Reports.Results: Two randomised controlled trials and four quasi-experimental studies were included, with an average PEDro score of 7.3. One included case study scored 5. This review included 345 participants. Motor proficiency includes balance, coordination, strength and agility. Agility showed a significant improvement after 5 (p = 0.01) or 24 (p 0.01) weeks. Strength showed a significant improvement after a 6- (p = 0.000) or 24-week intervention (p 0.05). Balance showed inconclusive results for adults, and significant improvement in children after 6 (p = 0.000), 8 (p 0.05) or 24 (p 0.003) weeks. One study (n = 155) showed that upper limb and bilateral coordination improved significantly after 24 weeks (p 0.003).Conclusion: Level II, III-1 and IV evidence suggested that VRT may be valuable to improve agility and strength in individuals with Down syndrome, and balance and coordination in children with Down syndrome.Clinical implications: It may be beneficial to use VRT in addition to standard physiotherapy or OT interventions for improving motor proficiency in individuals with Down syndrome.
 
Publisher AOSIS
 
Contributor
Date 2021-05-20
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion — Systematic review;
Format text/html application/epub+zip text/xml application/pdf
Identifier 10.4102/sajp.v77i1.1516
 
Source South African Journal of Physiotherapy; Vol 77, No 1 (2021); 18 pages 2410-8219 0379-6175
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://sajp.co.za/index.php/sajp/article/view/1516/2436 https://sajp.co.za/index.php/sajp/article/view/1516/2435 https://sajp.co.za/index.php/sajp/article/view/1516/2437 https://sajp.co.za/index.php/sajp/article/view/1516/2434
 
Coverage — — Down syndrome
Rights Copyright (c) 2021 Jessica Stander, Jennifer C. du Preez, Chantel Kritzinger, Natasha M. Obermeyer, Silke Struwig, Nikki van Wyk, Jessica Zaayman, Marlette Burger https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0