Record Details

Exploring Grade 8 Khelobedu-speaking learners’ writing challenges in Sepedi Home Language in Mopani District, South Africa

Literator


 
 
Field Value
 
Title Exploring Grade 8 Khelobedu-speaking learners’ writing challenges in Sepedi Home Language in Mopani District, South Africa
 
Creator Ramothwala, Tsebo Segabutla, Madikwa H. Rwodzi, Christopher Thokwane, Dira
 
Subject Education; Language language learning; diglossic situations; dialect; language variation; Northern Sotho; Khelobedu; writing; home language.
Description In South Africa, Khelobedu-speaking leaners learn Sepedi as their ‘home language’ at school because Khelobedu (sometimes referred to as ‘Selobedu’) is classified as a dialect of Sotho. This article draws on the challenges that Grade 8 Khelobedu-speaking learners experience when writing in Sepedi Home Language. This article will encourage teachers to reflect on their teaching and support the learners to write better. The study aimed to investigate the Selobedu-speaking leaners’ writing experiences in Sepedi Home Language with reference to dialectical variations, exploring the strategies learners use to adapt and making recommendations to support them. A qualitative research study was conducted at two public high schools in Mopani District. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with four Sepedi teachers, learner group interviews with 30 learners from two high schools (15 per school) and 60 learner essays (30 per school). The data were analysed through content analysis and error analysis. Both the teacher interviews and learner focus group interviews revealed that the teachers used Khelobedu in the Sepedi classrooms. Moreover, teacher interviews also suggested that the learners also used Khelobedu words and pronunciation in their writing and spelt Sepedi words the way they pronounced them in Khelobedu. Further, the essays indicated that the learners struggled to write in Sepedi; they made spelling mistakes, had limited Sepedi vocabulary and struggled with conjunctive and disjunctive writing. Finally, the findings revealed that the dialectal variations between Khelobedu and Sepedi interfered with the learners’ writing instead of being additive. The learners used Khelobedu words in their writing and spelt Sepedi words the way they pronounced them in Khelobedu.
 
Publisher AOSIS
 
Contributor Tshwane University of Technology
Date 2021-04-12
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion — — Explorative; qualitative; case study
Format text/html application/epub+zip text/xml application/pdf
Identifier 10.4102/lit.v42i1.1744
 
Source Literator; Vol 42, No 1 (2021); 11 pages Literator; Vol 42, No 1 (2021); 11 pages 2219-8237 0258-2279
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://literator.org.za/index.php/literator/article/view/1744/3432 https://literator.org.za/index.php/literator/article/view/1744/3431 https://literator.org.za/index.php/literator/article/view/1744/3433 https://literator.org.za/index.php/literator/article/view/1744/3430
 
Coverage South Africa; Limpopo Province; Ga-Modjadji; Ga-Motupa none learners; Grade8; boys and girls; Khelobedu speaking
Rights Copyright (c) 2021 Tsebo Ramothwala, Madikwa H. Segabutla, Christopher Rwodzi, Dira Thokwane https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0