Setting up a molecular diagnostic laboratory for SARS-CoV-2 testing: Experience of a single centre in a resource-constrained setting

African Journal of Laboratory Medicine


 
 
Field Value
 
Title Setting up a molecular diagnostic laboratory for SARS-CoV-2 testing: Experience of a single centre in a resource-constrained setting
 
Creator Osaigbovo, Iriagbonse I. Igbarumah, Isaac O. Muoebonam, Ekene B. Obaseki, Darlington E.
 
Subject Laboratory Medicine; Medical Microbiology; Laboratory Management COVID-19; coronavirus disease 2019; laboratory; Nigeria; molecular diagnosis; SARS-CoV-2; severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2; UBTH; University of Benin Teaching Hospital; resource-constrained.
Description Background: Molecular detection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is at the forefront of the global response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. However, molecular diagnostic capabilities are poorly developed in many African countries. Efforts by the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control and other public health agencies to scale up facilities for molecular testing across the continent are well documented, but there are few accounts from the laboratories at the frontline.Intervention: As part of an institutional response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria, signed a memorandum of understanding with a World Bank-supported institution to obtain a non-proprietary testing platform, renovated an existing molecular virology laboratory and validated the test process to make SARS-CoV-2 testing readily available for decision-making by frontline health workers. These efforts resulted in the University of Benin Teaching Hospital’s inclusion in the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control COVID-19 molecular laboratory network. The laboratory achieved a turnover of 12 123 tests within 7 months of operation. Challenges faced and dealt with include incompatible equipment, limited skilled manpower, unstable (unreliable) electric power supply, disrupted procurement and supply chain, and significant overhead costs.Lessons learnt: Molecular diagnostic capability is essential in laboratory preparedness for pandemic response and can be achieved by establishing collaborative networks in low-resource settings.Recommendations: Molecular diagnostic capabilities attained during the COVID-19 pandemic should be maintained by governmental support of the local biotechnology sector, collaboration with partners and stakeholders and the expansion of diagnostics to include other diseases of public health importance.
 
Publisher AOSIS
 
Contributor NIL
Date 2021-03-30
 
Type info:eu-repo/semantics/article info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion — —
Format text/html application/epub+zip text/xml application/pdf
Identifier 10.4102/ajlm.v10i1.1326
 
Source African Journal of Laboratory Medicine; Vol 10, No 1 (2021); 7 pages 2225-2010 2225-2002
 
Language eng
 
Relation https://ajlmonline.org/index.php/ajlm/article/view/1326/1930 https://ajlmonline.org/index.php/ajlm/article/view/1326/1929 https://ajlmonline.org/index.php/ajlm/article/view/1326/1931 https://ajlmonline.org/index.php/ajlm/article/view/1326/1928
 
Coverage Edo state; Nigeria; Sub-Saharan Africa — —
Rights Copyright (c) 2021 Iriagbonse I. Osaigbovo, Isaac O. Igbarumah, Ekene B. Muoebonam, Darlington E. Obaseki https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0